Great post on Amazon Affiliate Marketing with a lot of golden nuggets. I particularly like the advice about starting with a niche that you’re truly interested in, and then only after gaining success in that, then you can delve out into other niches that you may not have as much interest in. This is a great strategy for newbies to gain some success without getting bored, burned out or discouraged early on.
I have found that one size doesn’t fit all. Rather, specific types promotions of particular products work well with Amazon. I have also had some success by getting people in the Amazon door for other reasons. For example I’ve experimented a couple of times on dPS with running a posts that gave readers a hypothetical $1000 to spend on photography gear and asked them to surf around Amazon and choose what they wanted to buy. The result was 350 comments (a fun community building exercise) and quite a few sales and commissions!
That is just like an eye opening article for the interested in Amazon Affiliates like me. Really great to get the part by part explanations and outlines. I started watching your YouTube channel courses. Being a newbie I have begun to go through your blog as well. Hope one day I would meet you and off course without bothering with the lame basic queries 🙂 .
Okay, so far we’ve talked about some of the key strategies for success as an Amazon affiliate, focused mostly on the positives—the what to dos—along with a few things to avoid. Now let’s talk about a few more things on the negative side of the equation: the practices you need to avoid if you want to grow your affiliate income (and yes, avoid getting in trouble with Amazon).
Some advertisers offer multi-tier programs that distribute commission into a hierarchical referral network of sign-ups and sub-partners. In practical terms, publisher "A" signs up to the program with an advertiser and gets rewarded for the agreed activity conducted by a referred visitor. If publisher "A" attracts publishers "B" and "C" to sign up for the same program using his sign-up code, all future activities performed by publishers "B" and "C" will result in additional commission (at a lower rate) for publisher "A".
The dollar amount of commissions an affiliate has to accrue before being paid. Some merchants set a minimum payment threshold themselves (to lower accounting costs by paying less frequently to people sending very few sales) while others allow the affiliate to do so (usually to avoid receiving frequent smaller checks and instead receive one larger one).

Mention it in a blog post. A lot of bloggers get great initial results by working backward. Make a list of your top 5 or 10 blog posts. What things would be a natural fit in there? If it's a recipe post, maybe it's a few of the necessary tools needed to complete the recipe. Include your Amazon link. If it's a potty training tale, include a list of books you read or potty training supplies you recommend. Still not sure? Google posts similar to yours. What are those people promoting within those posts?
Although I have never done much affiliate marketing, Peters's AFFILIATE MARKETING FOR BEGINNERS seems to me to be an excellent introduction. It surprised me that a lot of the material presented was useful for making money online in other ways than affiliate marketing. For example, there are recommendations concerning outsourcing content, on- and off-page search engine optimization, and press releases. I am not unfamiliar with such topics, and the recommendations seem very good. The whole book is clearly organized and well-written. There is even a bonus e-book provided at its end. This book is an outstanding value.

Since the emergence of affiliate marketing, there has been little control over affiliate activity. Unscrupulous affiliates have used spam, false advertising, forced clicks (to get tracking cookies set on users' computers), adware, and other methods to drive traffic to their sponsors. Although many affiliate programs have terms of service that contain rules against spam, this marketing method has historically proven to attract abuse from spammers.
The fact that they sell anything means anyone can make money with affiliate marketing. You can make money selling to people who are into teapots, doll collecting or expensive watches. There are so many products to promote, the possibilities are endless here. The second important reason to sell with Amazon when you’re a beginner is that Amazon is a trusted brand; it’s a brand that is known worldwide. Just about any American has ordered one thing or another through Amazon by now. The fact that it’s a known and trusted brand is important if you’re looking to learn and not worry if you will get screwed over. Amazon’s terms for sale are really good, too. If you send someone to Amazon and they purchase a product right away, you’ll get paid the commission. If the customer doesn’t buy right away, you will have 24 hours to make money off a sale. And, if a customer adds the product to their cart, they have 30 days to purchase it for you to make a commission off the sale. Once again, that’s fantastic.
Affiliate marketing has increased in prominence with the internet age. Amazon popularized the practice by creating an affiliate marketing program where websites and bloggers put links to the Amazon page for a product being reviewed or discussed in order to receive advertising fees when a purchase is made. In this sense, affiliate marketing is essentially a pay for performance marketing program where the act of selling a consumer on a product is outsourced across a potentially vast network.
×