You advertise a product on your blog and you get paid whenever somebody purchases. Affiliate commissions can be 50% and over of the sales price for electronically deliverable products (eBooks, software, etc) that have no replacement costs. Physical products can offer 2% commission upwards. It doesn’t sound a lot, but if you sell a $10,000 entertainment system from a click on your site…
One of my websites is now i think 1,5 years old and my sales was 0,00 with the amazon programm, ok. I have to say i put this site on and didn t do anything for the popularity so i think i recept also only 5 visitors from google i think. So this tells us, if you try to earn a little money with your website you need to work very hard and if you also are a little bit lucky, you can earn a good amout of money with your site….
Amazon won’t approve unless you already have 500+ visitors a month on your blog/site? Does that sound right? And it seems they don’t much like competition on your blog/site either. But you can’t get traffic unless you monetize it with adsense or other affiliate programs. The blogger blogs are niche specific and made for getting Amazon products on board… but they aren’t approving because of low traffic, which is counterproductive.
Thank you – Danke! Yes, it takes a lot of hard work and patience to be successful. You need to put in all the ground work to get your site on page 1 of Google for your keywords to get a fair amount of visitors. Once you are there, you can earn a regular stream of income. But you also have to keep at it, don’t relax for too long, because Google might just take you off page 1 again, and then you are back to square one.
Let's take your info regarding the Yoga niche - I am thinking of making a main Word Press page myself and then build individual pages using software mentioned on your blog called "speedxxx" (can't remember full name 555) These pages can be quickly constructed and easily linked to each other via contextual links. Obviously making sure each page-product are closely related plus the normal traffic generation techniques, do you think this is a viable way to build an authority site Stuart and also overcome this idea that some Amazon products sell whereas some don't?
ive been thinking about this affiliate website thing for quite some time. those gurus make it sound so easy till i started researching reading up a bit here and there. all these things which needs to be done... blogging, pillowing, backlinking, wordpress, finding niches etc etc... the physically doing it on the pc, and finding content and pics and vids etc is whats stressing me out. at the moment im so confused !! haha i read that its best if you decide on a niche on which you have allot of knowledge, like a hobby etc. i dont have hobbies due to working away from home, and i build substations for a living. i cant think of a niche involving substations. are there videos somewhere which nicely shows exactly where to click what while building the website and doing the blogging, pillowing, backlinking etc? and honestly, with all the websites on the net allready, does new websites have a chance in 2014 to make some money?
While your site is still new, it's a good idea to start capitalizing on someone else's audience. Continue focusing on building your own content, but also considering writing content for a few big, high-traffic blogs that are relevant for your niche. By writing content for a bigger site, you are able to get in front of another audience and showcase your expertise on a particular topic. This will eventually lead to more traffic to your site, as well. 
Man, Ive been pulling my hair out over not really getting much from my Amazon Affil. based site. Im grateful you put this up about your experience with it. As far as you thinking you aren’t getting much back because you only sell low priced items goes, Im pushing big ticket items and it really isnt much better. Consider how much traffic you need to sell the lower priced stuff and then double or triple it to get a sale on a big ticket item.
I come from an unsuccessful background of web design/SEO. I blogged because I knew it was good for SEO, but my articles didn’t monetize. I took a leap of faith and dropped my clients to figure out blogging/affiliate marketing. I was good at website speed optimization and knew hosting was the #1 factor. After some research, I saw SiteGround was #1 in most Facebook polls and had a great reputation with generous affiliate commissions. So I wrote tutorials on website speed… how to configure WordPress cache plugins, hosting reviews, and other speed-related topics. Usually near the end of a post I would say “…and here’s why you should switch to SiteGround” with evidence on why they’re the best… polls, tweets, load time improvements, etc. That’s when things got good. Now I have 0 clients and the freedom to live how I want. I wrote this tutorial because I’m actually excited to help people do the same – without the BS.
I’m actually going through setting up a few different sites that are only going to be monetized with Amazon. There are certain benefits to Amazon such as a well-known website and added items on purchases and then there are negatives as well such as low commission and short cookie span. I definitely think you have to choose higher priced items if you want to make decent money from Amazon.
Thanks for writing this post because while the above users seem to have experience with the Amazon Affiliate Program, this guy has NONE! I didn’t know that’s what affiliate programs were, and if I HAD known in the past, I might have some extra income from it right now. Now that I’ve been learning about SEO and keywords, I might be interested in setting up something like this. I’ve always wanted to have my own “online business”, and after trying things like eBay stores, Amazon Affiliate Programs seem like the way to go for me! I will have to read the info on it, and also some of the above blogs. Thank you for opening my eyes O.O

An affiliate program refers to the arrangement in which a merchant or owner of a product pays a certain amount of commission for the sale generated by an affiliate. The affiliate sets up a website where he/she will post affiliate links that will direct visitors to the merchant’s site so they can make a purchase. Information on commission rates are provided in the program.


In simple terms, affiliate marketing means selling another person’s or company’s products and services. It’s like a referral service. You set up a website or blog and join affiliate programs that are relevant to your audience. You can connect to these programs through affiliate networks that provide you with a link that you include on your site. When someone clicks the link and purchases the product or service you’re marketing, you receive a percentage of the sale proceeds as a commission. 
You advertise a product on your blog and you get paid whenever somebody purchases. Affiliate commissions can be 50% and over of the sales price for electronically deliverable products (eBooks, software, etc) that have no replacement costs. Physical products can offer 2% commission upwards. It doesn’t sound a lot, but if you sell a $10,000 entertainment system from a click on your site…

While your site is still new, it's a good idea to start capitalizing on someone else's audience. Continue focusing on building your own content, but also considering writing content for a few big, high-traffic blogs that are relevant for your niche. By writing content for a bigger site, you are able to get in front of another audience and showcase your expertise on a particular topic. This will eventually lead to more traffic to your site, as well. 

This site is owned and operated by Broketobest.com and is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Broketobest also participates in affiliate programs with Bluehost, Clickbank, CJ, ShareASale, and other sites.It is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies.


Your life situation might dictate that $200/day is the pinnacle of financial motivation. You can drive yourself to attain this goal, but any further and the motivation begins to slip. That’s a point of diminishing returns. Call it your comfort zone. Any work to advance beyond this point comes with the additional burden of pushing you out of that comfort zone. And so procrastination sets in, along with the dual crippling fears of failure and success.
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